Did You Know?

Twenty-three men and no women have

been executed in the United States in 2017.

Updated: Thursday, October 19, 2017  10:38 pm EDT

 

Torrey McNabb has been executed in Alabama.  The execution was delayed several hours due to appeals.  Read more here.

 

Updated: Thursday, October 19, 2017  9:28 pm EDT

 

The Supreme Court of the United States has lifted the temporary stay of execution for Torrey McNabb, allowing his execution to proceed.

 

Updated: Thursday, October 19, 2017  7:08 pm EDT

 

The Supreme Court of the United States has issued a temporary stay of execution for Torrey McNabb, halting his execution that was scheduled to begin at 6 pm CDT.  The stay could be lifted tonight, allowing the execution to proceed.  Alabama has until midnight to begin the execution.

 

Updated: Thursday, October 19, 2017  6:15 pm EDT

 

The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals has rejected Torrey McNabb's most recent request to halt his execution, scheduled for this evening.  Earlier this evening, the Supreme Court of the United States overturned a stay of execution granted to Torrey.

 

Updated: Thursday, October 19, 2017  6:03 pm EDT

 

The Supreme Court of the United States has overturned a stay of execution for Torrey McNabb, who is once again, scheduled to be executed this evening.  The stay of execution was initially granted by Chief U.S. District Judge W. Keith Watkins of the Middle District of Alabama Northern Division, and later upheld by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals.  Torrey and his attorneys were arguing that Alabama's execution protocol provided a significant risk of pain and suffering during the execution, which would be a violation of Torrey's 8th Amendment rights.  Two of the nine Supreme Court Justices would have granted the stay.  Torrey has again filed with the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals for stay of execution.

 

Updated: Wednesday, October 18, 2017  9:22 pm EDT

 

A three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld the stay of execution for Torrey McNabb granted by Chief U.S. District Judge W. Keith Watkins of the Middle District of Alabama Northern Division.  The stay was granted after Torrey and his attorney successfully argued that Alabama's execution protocol provided a significant risk of pain and suffering during the execution, which would be a violation of Torrey's 8th Amendment rights.  Alabama has appealed this ruling to the Supreme Court of the United States.  The Supreme Court of the Untied States has previously overturned similar rulings  and allowed executions to proceed in the state.

 

Updated: Monday, October 16, 2017  2:12 pm EDT

 

Chief U.S. District Judge W. Keith Watkins of the Middle District of Alabama Northern Division has stayed the execution of Torrey McNabb.  Torrey and his attorney successfully argued that Alabama's execution protocol provided a significant risk of pain and suffering during the execution, which would be a violation of Torrey's 8th Amendment rights.  Alabama has appealed this ruling.  The Supreme Court of the Untied States has previously overturned similar rulings  and allowed executions to proceed in the state.

 

Updated: Monday, October 16, 2017  10:46 am EDT

 

Torrey Twane McNabb is scheduled to be executed at 6 pm CDT, on Thursday, October 19, 2017, at the Holeman Correctional Facility in Atmore, Alabama.  Forty-year-old Torrey is convicted of the murder of Police Officer Anderson Gordon on September 24, 1997, in Montgomery, Alabama.  Torrey has spent the last 18 years on Alabama’s death row. 

 

Torrey’s father had spent time in prison and his mother was a cocaine addict.  Torrey began using cocaine around the age of 14 or 15.

 

On September 24, 1997, Sanford Sharpe, a bail bondsman, was attempting to locate Torrey McNabb, who had failed to appear in court to charges of receiving stolen property and possession of a controlled substance.  After failing to appear, a warrant was issued for his arrest.  Sanford located McNabb and McNabb’s grandmother’s residence.  Sanford spoke with McNabb, who said he would go with Sanford.  Under the pretense of putting on shoes, McNabb fled out the back door. 

 

Later that day, around 1:30 pm, Sanford again located McNabb, this time parked in a vehicle outside of his grandmother’s home.  Sanford pulled up beside McNabb.  When McNabb noticed Sanford, he quickly drove away.  Sanford pursued.  While crossing an intersection, McNabb struck another vehicle.  Sanford drove up and started to get out of his vehicle when McNabb started shooting a gun.  Sanford quickly drove away from the gunfire and called the police.  Sanford then returned to intersection and parked next to a police patrol vehicle.  Inside was Officer Anderson Gordon, who had been shot several times.  Sanford, fearing for his safety, pulled out his own weapon.  Police arrived a short time later and confiscated Sanford’s weapon. 

 

Annie Gamble, was the women whose vehicle had been struck by McNabb.  After being struck, Annie saw McNabb, who she identified later, pull a gun.  She pleaded with him not to shoot her.  McNabb began shooting at a red truck that drove by.  Annie then saw McNabb walking towards the police patrol parked on the corner, hiding his weapon.  McNabb approached the rear of the patrol car and began firing into the car, shattering the rear window.  When the officer fired back, McNabb fled the scene.  

 

Several other eyewitnesses corroborated Annie’s story.  They were also able to tell police what direction the shooter had fled.  Police officers pursued.  McNabb attempted to hide in a ditch and, upon discover, shot at the officers.  The officers returned fire, wounding McNabb.

 

McNabb was treated for his injuries and confessed to the shootings, telling police a similar story as reported by the witnesses.  However, McNabb disputes the earlier events as reported by Sanford, alleging that Sanford fired at him first and was an “out of control bounty hunter.”  He also claims that he approached Officer Gordon for help and that the officer pointed a gun at him first, causing him the panic.  Witnesses report that the police officers weapon was not drawn when McNabb began shooting.  He also argued that he was high on cocaine that morning making him unaware of his actions and paranoid.  McNabb was sentenced to death in 1999.

 

McNabb has requested that the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals halt his execution over concerns about the state's lethal injection protocol.

  

Please pray for peace and healing for the family of Officer Anderson Gordon.  Please pray for strength for the family of Torrey McNabb.  Please pray that if Torrey is innocent, lacks the competency to be executed, or should not be executed for any other reason, evidence will be provided prior to the execution.  Please pray that Torrey may come to find peace through a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, if he has not already.

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