The husband and wife thought they were prepared.  With elderly parents, they even expected a cancer diagnoses sooner or later.  They had discussed what to do in the event of the eventual death.  They thought they were prepared, that they couldn't be surprised.  In the end, it wasn’t the diagnoses that was surprising, it was who had received the diagnosis.

 

They never thought it would be her.  Kira had not seemed that sick when she went to visit the doctor.  She had fallen and received lump and some bruising.  But a week later the lump was still there.  They went to the doctor, who seemed unconcerned but ran some tests, just to be safe.  The results were nothing they expected.  Kira was only two-years-old.  How could she have cancer?  

 

As her parents later learned, Kira became one of the approximately 43 children in the United States diagnosed with cancer that day.  Childhood cancer affects all ethnic, gender, and socio-economic groups.  They also learned that thanks to today’s medicine, Kira’s chances of survival were high.  Eighty percent of children diagnosed with cancer will survive.  Sadly that means one in five children diagnosed with cancer will not survive into adulthood.  Often, survival rates depend upon the type of cancer, with some being more deadly than others.  Also unfortunately, most survivors of childhood cancer will end up with at least one significant, life-long health problem.

  

September has been designated as National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.  Take some time this month to pray for children with cancer.  Pray for strength for their parents and family.  Pray for wisdom for scientists working to cure cancer.

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