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Black History Month - Heart Surgery with Dr. Daniel Williams

Black History Month - Heart Surgery with Dr. Daniel Williams

In the United States of America, the month of February is Black History Month. It is a time to remember the achievements of men and women of color made throughout the history of this country. From a time of slavery to a time of freedom that did not really feel all that free, to a movement that would change the nation forever, men and women of color have played key roles in making a better quality of life for all mankind.

Daniel Hale Williams was born on January 18, 1856, five years before the outbreak of the Civil War. His childhood began in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, as the son and fifth of seven children of an African-American barber and a Scots-Irish, African American mother. Around the age of nine, Daniel’s father died of tuberculosis and his mother, unable to support all the children, sent some to live with relatives.

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TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: The Tuskegee Airmen Breaking Barriers

TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: The Tuskegee Airmen Breaking Barriers

In the United States of America, the month of February is Black History Month. It is a time to remember the achievements of men and women of color made throughout the history of this country. From a time of slavery to a time of freedom that did not really feel all that free, to a movement that would change the nation forever, men and women of color have played key roles in making a better quality of life for all mankind.

The Wright brothers took their first flight in 1903. Six short years later, in 1909, the United States military began using airplanes, with World War I was the first major conflict to significantly utilize aircraft. However, in the United States, the honor and privilege of flying a plane was reserved only for white males. It was not the only limitation placed on African-Americans in the military. Many top officials believed that African-Americans were too uneducated, untrainable, and unreliable for many positions within the military.

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TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: Notable Achievements by Tuskegee Airmen

Black History Month: Notable Achievements by Tuskegee Airmen

Daniel “Chappie” James Jr., who was a lieutenant when he flew as a member of the 99th during the war, became the first African-American to become a four-star general.

Marion Rodgers, also a member of the 99th during the war, went on to work for NORAD and was a program developer for the Apollo 13 project.

Lucius Theus, an aviator, stayed in the military, rising to the rank of major general. During his time, he worked to implement a direct deposit system for service members.

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Sitting for Equality: The Women Who Came Before Rosa Parks

Black History Month: Sitting for Equality: The Women Who Came Before Rosa Parks

Every February, children throughout the United States are taught the story of Rosa Parks, the black women who refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama to a white person. Her refusal, her determination to make a stand - or in this case, take a seat - for equal rights led to a cascade of events. Rosa’s stand - seat - is inspirational, but did you know that she was not the first to refuse to give up her seat?

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Rosa Parks: Sitting for Equality

Black History Month: Rosa Parks: Sitting for Equality

In the United States of America, the month of February is Black History Month. It is a time to remember the achievements that men and women of color made throughout the history of this country. From a time of slavery to a time of freedom that did not really feel all that free, to a movement that would change the nation forever, men and women of color have played key roles in making a better quality of life for all mankind.

Rosa Louise McCauley was born on February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama. Her grandparents, both former slaves, took in Rosa and her mother after her mother divorced her father. From a young age, her grandparents instilled in her a belief of racial equality, however, Rosa grew up surrounded by racial discrimination. A standout moment in her childhood was her grandfather standing in front of the their home with a shotgun, while members of the Ku Klux Klan marched down the street.

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Black History Month: Mary Louise Smith, Remembering the Women Who Came Before Rosa Parks

Black History Month: Mary Louise Smith, Remembering the Women Who Came Before Rosa Parks

On December 1, 1955, a woman, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama to a white person. This act ignited a spark in the American Civil Rights movement, leading to boycotts of the busses and demands to an end of racial segregation. But everyone knows about Rosa Parks and her famous refusal! But, do you know about the woman who came before Rosa? About the other women who refused to give up their seats?

Mary Louise Smith was born in 1937, to a Catholic family in Montgomery, Alabama. During her childhood, she attended and graduated from St. Jude Educational Institute. On October 21, 1955, at the age of 18, Mary was returning home by way of the Montgomery city bus. At a stop after Mary had boarded and seated, a white passenger boarded. There was no place for the white passenger to sit. Mary was order to relinquish her seat. She refused. Mary was arrested and charged with failure to obey segregation orders and given a nine dollar fine, which her father paid.

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Black History Month: Aurelia Browder Coleman, Remembering the Women Who Came Before Rosa Parks

Black History Month: Aurelia Browder Coleman, Remembering the Women Who Came Before Rosa Parks

On December 1, 1955, a woman, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama to a white person. This act ignited a spark in the American Civil Rights movement, leading to boycotts of the busses and demands to an end of racial segregation. But everyone knows about Rosa Parks and her famous refusal! But, do you know about the woman who came before Rosa? About the other women who refused to give up their seats?

Aurelia Shines Browder Coleman was born on January 29, 1919, in Montgomery, Alabama, where she remained for her entire life, working a variety of jobs including nurse, midwife, seamstress, businesswoman and housewife. Her education came later in life, not completing high school until she was in her 30s. She went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in science from Alabama State University, where she graduated with honors and was member of the National Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society. It was also during her time at college that she was inspired by a professor to become involved in tackling the injustices of the transportation system.

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Black History Month: Claudette Colvin, Remembering the Women Who Came Before Rosa Parks

Black History Month: Claudette Colvin, Remembering the Women Who Came Before Rosa Parks

On December 1, 1955, a woman, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama to a white person. This act ignited a spark in the American Civil Rights movement, leading to boycotts of the busses and demands to an end of racial segregation. But everyone knows about Rosa Parks and her famous refusal! But, do you know about the woman who came before Rosa? About the other women who refused to give up their seats?

Claudette Colvin was born on September 5, 1939. She lived in a poorer section of Montgomery, Alabama. By 1955, Claudette attended Booker T. Washington High School, where she excelled. Claudette was a dreamer - she wanted to be President someday! Coincidentally, by March 2, 1955, Claudette was learning about the civil rights movement in school. She had just written a paper about the local customs at department stores. People of color were not allowed to try on clothes or shoes. They were not allowed in the stores’ dressing rooms.

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Friendship 9 Conviction Overturned

Friendship 9 Conviction Overturned

On January 31, 1961, several young men, mostly from Friendship Junior College in Rock Hill, South Carolina, chose to eat lunch at the counter of a local McCrory’s Five & Dime. They walked into the restaurant, sat down, and ordered hamburgers, soft drinks, and coffee. The men were refused service and ordered to leave the establishment. When the men refused, the police were called. The young men were beaten, to the cheers of the crowd that had gathered. The men were hauled off to jail. They were given a choice: a $100 fine or 30 days of hard labor at the York County Prison Farm. One man paid the fine. The remaining nine chose to serve their time, sparking a “jail, no bail” movement.

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TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: George Washington Carver

TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: The Story of Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr.

In the United States of America, the month of February is Black History Month. It is a time to remember the achievements that men and women of color made throughout the history of this country. From a time of slavery to a time of freedom that did not really feel all that free, to a movement that would change the nation forever, men and women of color have played key roles in making a better quality of life for all mankind.

Near the end of the Civil War, a child, the last of many, was born to Mary and Giles, slaves to Moses and Susan Carver in Diamond, Missouri. The date of birth for the child is unknown. The child was named George Washington and given no surname, as his father was killed before his birth. About one week after his birth, George was kidnapped, along with his sister and mother, and sold in Kentucky. Moses was able to retrieve George and bring him back to Missouri. In 1865, about one year after George was born, the Civil War ended and slaves were freed. Moses and Susan chose to keep George and to educate him. Since no school nearby would accept clack children, George adopted their surname and went on to become known to history as George Washington Carver.

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TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: The Story of Richard Allen

TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: The Story of Richard Allen

In the United States of America, the month of February is Black History Month. It is a time to remember the achievements that men and women of color made throughout the history of this country. From a time of slavery to a time of freedom that did not really feel all that free, to a movement that would change the nation forever, men and women of color have played key roles in making a better quality of life for all mankind.

On February 14, 1790, a slave was born to Benjamin Chew, who was a wealthy merchant in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The child, named Richard, and his family, were then sold to Stokeley Sturgis, a plantation owner in Delaware. The family was divided up when Sturgis faced monetary problems. Richard remained with Sturgis, along with an older brother and a sister. They continued to serve Sturgis, but also began attending meetings of the local Methodist Society, which welcomed all blacks, slaves and free men. Richard attended classes every week and taught himself to read and write. In 1782, Richard became licensed to preach.

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TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: The Story of Sojouner Truth "Isabella Baumfree"

TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: The Story of Sojouner Truth "Isabella Baumfree"

In the United States of America, the month of February is Black History Month. It is a time to remember the achievements that men and women of color made throughout the history of this country. From a time of slavery to a time of freedom that did not really feel all that free, to a movement that would change the nation forever, men and women of color have played key roles in making a better quality of life for all mankind.

In 1797, in Ulster County, New York, Isabella Baumfree was born to Elizabeth and James Baumfree, slaves to Colonel Johannes Hardenbergh. Isabella was one of 13 children. Isabella grew up speaking only Dutch until the age of nine, when she was sold to a new master, John Neely. John and his family only spoke English and frequently beat Isabella because of miscommunications. It was during her time with John that Isabella began her spiritual journey. Religion turned into her refuge. Isabella would have conversations with God in the woods and took to praying aloud during times of hardship. Isabella was sold twice more, eventually ending up as a slave to John Dumont of West Park, New York.

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TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: The Story of Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr.

TFFCM Celebrates Black History Month: The Story of Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr.

Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr., was born in the town of Paris, Kentucky, on March 4, 1877. His father, Sydney, was a former slave and son of Confederate Colonel John H. Morgan. His mother, Eliza Reed, was also a former slave who happened to be half American Indian. At the age of fourteen, Garrett quit school and moved to Cincinnati, Ohio to work as a handyman for a wealthy landowner. Garrett wanted an education and retained a tutor to instruct him during his stay in Cincinnati. In 1895, Garrett moved to Cleveland, Ohio, to work for a clothing manufacturer repairing sewing machines. It was at this job that Garrett made his first invention a belt-fastener for sewing machines.

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